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Characterization of pregnancy microbiome reveals variations in bacterial diversity

09/19/2018

September 19, 2018 - The collection of an estimated 100 trillion resident microorganisms of the human body, termed the human microbiome, contributes to the physiology of human health and disease including nutrition, immune function, metabolism, and development. Recent studies suggest that the maternal microbiome changes composition during gestation and may be associated with pre-term birth. Yet, there remains a lack of detailed analyses regarding the structure, function, and temporal dynamics of the maternal microbiome and how it contributes to gestational outcome and fetal development.

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IMAGE: The human microbiome is dynamic during pregnancy, with shifts in strains, species and predicted functions at each colonized body site. Understanding its role in maternal health has important implications for... view more 

Credit: CSHL Press

In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers performed detailed whole-community sequencing on the microbial communities of three maternal body sites (vagina, gut, and oral cavity) over the course of pregnancy from the first trimester through delivery. Lead author David A. Relman of Stanford University was, "surprised by the degree of diversity in the human microbiome at the level of bacterial strains and by their temporal patterns during the course of gestation." Of the nearly 1500 taxa identified, community diversity differed among body sites and throughout the course of pregnancy. The vagina was primarily dominated by one organism and taxonomic diversity increased with gestational age. In the gut and oral cavity the communities displayed high diversity throughout gestation, but the abundances of gene families and predicted functions changed over time. Interestingly, the microbiome variation in the oral cavity was associated with pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia. Another important finding of this study was the recovery of near-complete genomes of new strains of bacteria associated with disease. Further characterization of these organisms may improve our understanding of their role in human health.



While this research is still at least several steps away from clinical applications, Relman expects that this work will eventually lead to a more informed strategy for targeted interventions before and during pregnancy that seek to reinforce or restore key functions of the maternal microbiome in support of decreased pregnancy risks and healthier fetal development.

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Researchers from Stanford University, the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, the University of California, Berkeley, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory contributed to this work. The study was funded by grants from the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at Stanford University School of Medicine, the Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Endowment at Stanford University, the Chan Zuckerburg Biohub, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award 1K99HD090290.

Media Contacts:

The authors are available for more information by contacting Erin Digitale, Stanford University School of Medicine communications team (digitale@stanford.edu; +1-650-724-9175).



Interested reporters may obtain copies of the manuscript via email from Dana Macciola, Administrative Assistant, Genome Research (macciol@cshl.edu; +1-516-422-4012).

About the article:

The manuscript will be published online ahead of print on 19 Sept 2018. Its full citation is as follows: Goltsman D, Sun C, Proctor D, DiGiulio D, Robaczewska A, Thomas B, Shaw G, Stevenson D, Holmes S, Banfield J, Relman D. 2018. Metagenomic analysis with strain-level resolution reveals fine-scale variation in the human pregnancy microbiome. Genome Research doi: 10.1101/gr.236000.118.

About Genome Research:

Launched in 1995, Genome Research is an international, continuously published, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on research that provides novel insights into the genome biology of all organisms, including advances in genomic medicine. Among the topics considered by the journal are genome structure and function, comparative genomics, molecular evolution, genome-scale quantitative and population genetics, proteomics, epigenomics, and systems biology. The journal also features exciting gene discoveries and reports of cutting-edge computational biology and high-throughput methodologies.

About Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is an internationally renowned publisher of books, journals, and electronic media, located on Long Island, New York. Since 1933, it has furthered the advance and spread of scientific knowledge in all areas of genetics and molecular biology, including cancer biology, plant science, bioinformatics, and neurobiology. The Press is a division of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, an innovator in life science research and the education of scientists, students, and the public. For more information, visit our website at http://cshlpress.org.

Genome Research issues press releases to highlight significant research studies that are published in the journal.



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